Wildlife Inc. faces funding woes

Bradenton Beach, Fla. – The home on Avenue B in Bradenton Beach looks like any other on the street. The exception is the large tortoises milling around the fenced front yard, the colorful parrots calling “Hello” along the side yard, and the cages stacked upon cages filled with various wildlife in the backyard.

Wildlife Inc., an education and rehabilitation center for wildlife, calls Bradenton Beach home in the otherwise non-descript neighborhood.

Screech owls line a perch in one of the cages at Wildlife Inc. in Bradenton Beach.
Screech owls line a perch in one of the cages at Wildlife Inc. in Bradenton Beach.

Amid the screeching of birds, Gail Straight co-owner of the rehab with husband Ed Straight, a Bradenton Beach commissioner, said the organization is now facing a new financial obstacle.

“We’re trying to find a sponsor. They’re discontinuing the blood drive on the island,” said Straight. “For us it’s a matter of life and death if we can’t find out where the money is going to come from.”

The annual island blood drive was a saving grace for Wildlife Inc., and benefitted three other island charities: Anna Maria Island Privateers, Anna Maria Island Community Center and the volunteer West Manatee Fire and Rescue Auxiliary.

Gail Straight, owner of Wildlife Inc. in Bradenton Beach, holds a 15-week-old bobcat Aug. 6. The juvenile bobcat was rescued in Myakka City and brought to the Bradenton Beach center to be rehabilitated
Gail Straight, owner of Wildlife Inc. in Bradenton Beach, holds a 15-week-old bobcat Aug. 6. The juvenile bobcat was rescued in Myakka City and brought to the Bradenton Beach center to be rehabilitated

During the island blood drive, donors chose one or shared $100, given by an anonymous donor among the four charities.

Straight said the blood drive was Wildlife Inc.’s single biggest fundraiser, providing on average $10,000 in the weekend-long event.

Other sources of income for Wildlife Inc., include donations collected at festivals, payments for shows and two small local grants. Straight said the nonprofit also receives a small amount of personal donations.

Wildlife Inc. brings shows into Manatee and Sarasota county schools, organized by education director David Sadkin, but Straight said the fee for educational programs in schools is low to make it more affordable for the school.

“If you apply for 100 grants, you might get one. That’s why the blood donations were so important,” Straight said.

She said they learned in July the blood donation program was moving off the island.

A freezer at Wildlife Inc. is filled with $1,500 worth of mice and chicks – food for the birds of prey that are in the rehab.
A freezer at Wildlife Inc. is filled with $1,500 worth of mice and chicks – food for the birds of prey that are in the rehab.

Straight said Wildlife Inc. has been getting in more hawks and owls, birds of prey that are expensive to feed and has spent $10,000 this year on rats and chicks to feed those birds.

Wildlife Inc. rescues wildlife from all over Tampa Bay. The rehabilitation center has been in operation in Bradenton Beach for 28 years, and a second educational location, has operated for four years at Mixon Fruit Farm in Bradenton.

Wildlife Inc. employee Damen Hurd cares for the animals at the Mixon location and leads tours.

“This is really going to hit us hard. Hopefully the public will step up and help us out. It’s really sad. There’s not a lot people who will give donations to wildlife, but all kinds of people call for us to rescue them. We want to do it, but it’s hard to continue when you’re pouring your own money into it,” Hurd said.

A fawn with a broken vertebra rests at Wildlife Inc. in Bradenton Beach. The fawn was rescued from a residence in Tampa.
A fawn with a broken vertebra rests at Wildlife Inc. in Bradenton Beach. The fawn was rescued from a residence in Tampa.

The expansion to Mixon’s served several purposes. The space on the farm houses many animals that could not be released back into the wild due to permanent injuries another, and gives Wildlife Inc. a platform to educate the public about local wildlife.

The wildlife tours are integrated into Mixon’s tours of the citrus groves. Hurd said Mixon charges $10 for adults, and $5 for children to take the tour. For every adult 50 cents and a quarter from each child’s ticket goes to Wildlife Inc. And Mixon built some of the wildlife enclosures.

“The whole goal coming out here was to support the rehab. Now expenses have gone up and it’s just not sustainable. We’re really taking a hit,” said Hurd.

This article was originally published in The Islander, August 13, 2014.